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Proud to present Pieneman's 'Quatre Bras'

We are proud to present the famous painting 'Quatre Bras' of the Dutch historical painter Jan Willem Pieneman in our next volume 'Quatre Bras, Perponcher's gamble'. Pieneman was commissioned shortly after 1815 to represent the Prince of Orange for his heroic conduct during the battle of Quatre Bras and finished it in 1817. The oil canvas toured through several towns of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands and gained much appreciation, before it reached its final destination Palace Soestdijk where it can still be seen today.

Pieneman's 'Quatre Bras'

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Forestry expert on Bois de Bossu

The Bois de Bossu is long gone. Nevertheless it played a major role during the battle of Quatre Bras and dominated the terrain. So what did it actually look like?

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Contemporary atlasses of The Netherlands

Take the opportunity for yourselves to consult the maps of Joseph de Ferraris and Louis Capitaine, used during the campaign by the Quartermaster-General Constant-Rebecque as well as Napoleon Bonaparte. This will surely enhance your knowledge and pleasure, when consulting the maps in the series 'The Netherlands army during the Waterloo campaign'.

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Defected French general at Quatre Bras

Every one interested in the 1815 campaign is probably well familiar with the defection of the French general Bourmont on 15 June and how he passed over and was interrogated at the Prussian headquarters in Namur. All histories then continue he rode almost directly across Brussels to join the French royalist forces of King Louis XVIII at Ghent. But did he really?

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Battlefield walks at 1815 Quatre Bras

The past years the author has visited the battlefield of Quatre Bras several times to get a better understanding of the landscape. The crossroads were visited with the well-known large farm, the monuments and above all the walks across the entire battlefield included all other positions of both the Anglo-Allied forces as well as those of the French.

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